MarketingSEOUncategorizedWeb Development

Website Development

5 Website Mistakes

Websitemistakeshurtingyourbusiness

The world has moved online, whether you make and sell a specific product or offer a services, customers are finding businesses online. In a recent blog post we explained Why A Good Website Is Important, but this post is about some of the common mistakes we see when starting with new clients, building or updating websites.

1. Your website is too busy

Making your website reader friendly is key here. If your online website is the first time a client is interacting with your business and they come overloaded with information they are more likely to navigate off your page and find an easier to read site. A good way to create a visually more appealing website is to have more white space. Sometimes a little less is more. Keep text blocks short and sweet. If you need to expand on idea, think about creating a blog page to link to for more information.

2. Ignoring the back end of your site

There are a few tools like SCHEMA you can use in the back end of your website to improve your ranking in search engines. Alt text for images is a great way of having keywords added to content. Structured Data markup helps organize the information for search engines so it they can understand what your website is about.

3. Broken links

Broken links or links that lead to no where on your website have a lot of negative effects. Firstly, it is frustrating to potential clients/customers. Picture this, your client is on your e-commerce site and ready to purchase the adorable item you have on your landing page. They click and it leads them to an error message or somewhere else. Now the customer has to navigate around your site to find what they are looking for and are more likely to go somewhere else. Additionally, too may broken or damaged links on your website can hurt your ranking in search engines.

4. Your website is SLOW

As we have shared in previous blog posts 47% of users leave a website if its loading time is more than 3 seconds. People don’t want to wait for a site to load in order to find what they are looking for. Our fast digital world has people wanting instant solutions to their problems and are more likely to navigate away from your site if it is slow moving.

“47% of users leave a website if its loading time is more than 3 seconds.”

5. It’s not accessible

Know your audience, especially if they are needing alternative languages or voice reading options. You can check out this website for a scan of your website.

 

 

Does all of this seem a bit daunting? Take one thing at a time and work on it slowly. Or you can always chat with the Panda Rose team about helping get your website updated.

ProductivityProgrammingWeb Development

In many ways, the transition to PHP 7, from the 5.x line we had used for many years before, was a clean break, an opportunity to clean house and sweep aside development practices and software dependencies that had outlived their usefulness.

 

Operating on a codebase which had grown out of the days and practices of CodeIgniter and their ilk, which had proved useful for years but was unquestionably showing its age, we jumped at the opportunity to build the framework we would like to use in 2016, rather than the one we had inherited from 2009.

Here was an excuse to revamp our development practices, throw out bits that made sense in 2008 but were a source of a headache today, and incorporate improvements that have taken hold in the ecosystem in the meantime.

Most notable improvements are the standardization efforts that have occurred under the umbrella of PHP-FIG, and the package management ecosystem(courtesy of Composer) that these standards have enabled and allowed to thrive.

A packaging system is something that, given a lack of, you will inevitably try to invent yourself — poorly, incompatibly, and inevitably counter-productively. Such was the state of the PHP framework ecosystem before standardization, and the reorientation of our own framework from an inward-facing framework to an outward-looking one. A framework which naturally integrates with third-party packages and is itself incorporated into third-party packages in a similar fashion.

In this series, we will explore the changes that have occurred in our own development practice, the ways in which these are reflective of the ecosystem as a whole, and why these make for such an exciting time to be writing PHP on the backend.

Stay tuned.

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